Department of the Legislative Assembly

ANSWERS TO WRITTEN QUESTIONS - Answered by 11 October 2005

16 August 2005

2. Electoral Roll Enrolments

Ms CARNEY to CHIEF MINISTER

1. It was estimated that there were fewer people on the electoral roll for the financial year 2004-05 than the previous financial year. Given we have just had an election, did that prove to be the case?

2. How many new electors enrolled prior to the last general election?

ANSWER

1. More electors were enrolled across the Northern Territory at the end of the 2004-05 financial year than at the end of the 2003-04 financial year.

Some Legislative Assembly divisions, however, experienced a decrease in elector enrolment because of the impact of the 2004 Legislative Assembly redistribution.

Enrolment figures in respect to all Legislative Assembly divisions at the end of both financial years (plus the divisional figures immediately before and following the 2004 redistribution) are shown in Attachment A.

Please note that the close of rolls on 7/9/04 for the 2004 federal election provided a boost to enrolment figures for all divisions shortly before the Legislative Assembly redistribution was put into effect.

2. The Writ for the 2005 Legislative Assembly General Election was issued on 31/5/05 and the roll closed at 8 pm on 2/6/05.

Figures for roll addition transactions for each Legislative division in respect to the period 31/5/05 to 2/6/05 inclusive are shown in Attachment B.

3. Darwin City Waterfront - Revenue

Ms CARNEY to CHIEF MINISTER

1. What revenue will be received as the waterfront site is developed; how will it be paid and how much per year is this expected to be?

2. Where will this revenue be coming from?

ANSWER

Revenues are received from potentially five sources. These are:

Stage 1 property development (bank cheque on completion of each sale)

Stage 2 property development (bank cheque on completion of each sale)

Property Owners (rates, levies and concession charges paid to the Statutory Corporation)

Concession charges for use of public and other facilities

Darwin Convention and Exhibition Centre (revenues offset against expenses)

See Attachment C for Table.

4. Darwin City Waterfront – Performance Criteria for Operators

Ms CARNEY to MINISTER for INFRASTRUCTURE and TRANSPORT

1. Please detail the performance criteria set for the operators of the convention centre?

2,. What happens to payments to the operators if these criteria are not met?

3. Will the $3m annual payment to the DCEC be paid even if performance measures are not met?

4. For how long is the annual $3m to be paid to the operators?

5. What does incentivised mean?

ANSWER

Questions 1 and 2:

Performance criteria apply in four ways:

1. To the concession holder through asset availability criteria. All major functional spaces must be available for use by the convention centre. These are defined in the Concession Deed and if a functional space becomes unavailable due to failure of plant and equipment or other maintenance related causes the Concession Holders Availability Payment (the amount of principal and interest the Territory repays each quarter) can be abated according to set percentages ranging from 10% to 40% for individual items up to an aggregated abatement of 75%.

A functional space is either available or not available. There is no subjective measure.

2. To the convention centre operator through operational KPIs which relate to how well the operator is performing its obligations under the operating agreement. These include provision of reports, compliance with the local industry participation plan, results of Territory audits of the asset management plan, results of Territory audits of the business plan and insolvency.

Failure to meet these KPIs can result in an abatement of the operators fixed fee of between 10% and 100% depending on the particular KPI.

3. To the convention centre operator through a bonus scheme for out performance of its KPIs particularly those relating to operating budgets and numbers of international and national delegates.

4. Jointly to the concession holder and convention centre operator through a reduction to the Territory Incentive Payment (TIP). The TIP is based on realising a minimum number of international and national delegates measured against the initial business case.

The TIP represents a portion of the total equity the concession holder has invested in the convention centre and therefore the expected return on equity plus a portion of the fixed operator fee. Thus if the number of delegates falls below the base case the concession holder does not achieve its maximum return and if delegate numbers were to fall to zero, the return to equity is zero.

Question 3:

The operating payment (forecast to be $2.5m in the first stabilised year of operation) is based on actual vs forecast performance. Therefore the Territory only pays the actual amount of any operating deficit. If the operating performance is better than forecast the Territory operating payment will reduce.

If the performance criteria in relation to delegate numbers falls to less than 40% of the base case in three consecutive delegate years or the operator fails to achieve all of its operating KPIs in any one delegate year the Territory may request and the concession holder must replace the operator on the same terms and conditions and at its cost.

Question 4:

The annual operating contribution is paid for the duration of the concession period (ie 25 years).

Question 5:

Incentivised means there are a number of measures which impact in a positive or negative way to encourage high performance from the concession holder and operator.

The positive incentives are the TIP and the operating bonus. In both cases the relevant party can improve on its base return.

The negative incentives are the abatement regime for asset management and the operating KPIs which can result in an abatement of the fixed operating fee. These abatements are substantial (up to 75% of the Territory Availability Payment and up to 100% of the operator fixed management fee).

6. Darwin City Waterfront - Lock

Ms CARNEY to MINISTER for INFRASTRUCTURE and TRANSPORT

1. Why is the lock not included in the Community Infrastructure?

2. What guarantees are there that the consortium will build the lock at a later stage?

ANSWER

1. The lock is not needed until Stage 2 is under way.

The lock is not included in the Community Infrastructure because it is being provided and paid for by the private sector. The lock infrastructure may be built as part of Stage 1 at the option of the Stage 2 developer.

2. The lock is a required component of the Stage 2 infrastructure under the terms of the Residential Project Delivery Deed.

7. Darwin City Waterfront – Management Body

Ms CARNEY to MINISTER for INFRASTRUCTURE and TRANSPORT

1. What do you see to be the nature of the body that will manage the overall site?

2. Who will be responsible for the costs involved with this body?

ANSWER

1. The site will be managed by a statutory corporation to provide the usual functions of local government which will be established prior to the completion of stage one.

2. The Territory will ultimately be responsible for costs involved with this body which will be off-set by revenue raised through normal rates, levies and any concession charges.

8. Darwin City Waterfront – Water Quality

Ms CARNEY to MINISTER for INFRASTRUCTURE and TRANSPORT

Are there any safety concerns about water quality in this area?

ANSWER

There are no concerns about water quality in the area. The various separate water bodies will be required to meet the relevant standards for that particular use.

9. Darwin City Waterfront – Wave Pool

Ms CARNEY to MINISTER for INFRASTRUCTURE and TRANSPORT

1. Who will set the price of admission for the wave pool?

2. Will the wave pool be publicly or privately run?

ANSWER

1. Admission costs will depend on the nature of the final facility and will be established one all operational aspects are determined.

2. It is possible for the water recreation area to be run by either the private or the public sectors or a combination of both as appropriate.

10. Darwin City Waterfront – Roads Maintenance

Ms CARNEY to MINISTER for INFRASTRUCTURE and TRANSPORT

What amount has been put aside for the repair and maintenance of the roads leading in and out of the site?

ANSWER

McMinn Street access to the Darwin City Waterfront site will be upgraded to take account of the increased traffic generated by the development of the site.

This work will be undertaken in conjunction with the provision of headworks to the site boundary as provided for under the Territory obligations and will extend to the Bennett Street intersection.

Under the terms of the Community Infrastructure Project Delivery Deed, the developer will upgrade the existing Mavie Street consistent with the standard required by the Darwin City Council.

Traffic on all roads leading in and out of the site will be subject to legal load restrictions and will be maintained in accordance with usual arrangements from the maintenance budget.

20. Trans-Territory Pipeline – Loss of Economic Benefit

Ms CARNEY to CHIEF MINISTER

1. How many jobs will now not come to the Territory because of the collapse of the trans-Territory pipeline deal?

2. What does the loss of the trans-Territory pipeline mean in lost cost benefit to the Territory economy?

3. What impact will the collapse of the trans-Territory pipeline have on Woodside’s continued presence in the Territory?

4. Has the Territory government spent any money in assisting to secure the trans-Territory pipeline project for the Territory?

5. Indigenous stakeholders say they were looking to buy equity in the trans-Territory pipeline project with funding support from governments. What would have been the Territory government’s contribution to this equity proposal?

ANSWER

1. The exact number of operational positions linked to the TTP had not been determined. However, an estimate had been made of between 15 to 20 permanent jobs.

2. The proponents had undertaken an economic benefit analysis of the project. It was valued at $993m over 30 years. The nett revenue to the Territory government was $4.9m and the federal government would receive $43.4m over 33 years.

3. Woodside would be best placed to answer this question.

4. The Territory government established a task force to manage the facilitation demands of the TTP. Costs were incurred on that basis and absorbed within departmental budgets. No funds were provided to the TTP.

5. The Northern Land Council had approached the federal government for financial support for an equity purchase. It did not make any similar request to the Territory government, despite suggestions to the contrary.

21. Blacktip Gas

Ms CARNEY to CHIEF MINISTER

1. You told members of the Chamber of Commerce and Industry election lunch that: ‘Gas will come onshore from a second Blacktip field’. Is there actually a second field at Blacktip? If so, where, and what is its size?

2. When you told ABC radio that you had spoken to both Alcan and Woodside and they had told you of the difficulties in finalising the trans-Territory pipeline deal were you aware that the difficulties related to the cost of the gas?

ANSWER

1. Prior to the collapse of the deal between Alcan and the Blacktip JV, the project would have been the second onshore gas project.

2. The commercial negotiations between Alcan and Woodside were on foot since the project was announced in 2002. During that time, there had been various phases in those discussions.

Immediately prior to the collapse of the deal, all parties believed the project would overcome any outstanding matters. Examples of activities under way include:

the Blacktip EIS was in the final stages of assessment.

the TTP EIS was under assessment.

negotiations between TTP and the NLC were close to settlement.

the Commonwealth government was considering the report on the feasibility of Indigenous Equity on the project.

the TTP was in final negotiations with the Territory government on a project agreement.

Commercial deals of the scale of the Blacktip sale, at more than $2.5bn, are never complete until the final documents are signed. Government had been clear that a final investment decision was pending for both Blacktip and TTP projects.

The decision not to proceed was unexpected but a reflection of the commercial reality of such projects.

22. Trans-Territory Pipeline – Gas for Territory Consumption

Ms CARNEY to CHIEF MINISTER

1. Is your government having discussions with proponents of the PNG gas pipeline with a view to purchase gas for Territory consumption?

2. Which fields off the Territory coast do you believe represent a viable source for Territory gas supplies?

3. Can you give Territorians a guarantee that bringing gas onshore will mean cheaper energy costs?

4. Can you give Territorians a guarantee that the cost of their power will not increase during this term of office?

ANSWER

1. The Power and Water Corporation continues to have discussions/negotiations with all possible gas suppliers to the Northern Territory marketplace – which includes proponents of the PNG project.

2. Within the time frame for the next gas purchase by Power and Water, the following projects are potential supply sources:

Bayu-Undan
Sunrise
Blacktip
Petrel/Tern

In addition, other projects capable of supporting Power and Water include Amadeus Basin and the PNG project.

3. The cost of energy is a reflection of many factors, not the least being demand and supply at a global level. Power and Water’s contractual negotiations are on foot and their objective is to secure supply at competitive prices.

4. The NT government provides a substantial community service obligation payment to Power and Water to assist in keeping power costs to Territorians as affordable as possible and will continue to do so.

52. Office of Chief Minister – Reports

Ms CARNEY to CHIEF MINISTER

Detail expenditure for the Office of the Chief Minister on reports produced that have been either outsourced or produced internally, including:

(a) what was the purpose of the reports;

(b) who or what organisation prepared the reports;

(c) what was the cost of the report;
(d) has the report or reports been tabled in parliament; and

(e) what has been the outcome of those reports?

ANSWER

1. The Office of the Chief Minister did not produce any reports of this nature.

54. Office of Chief Minister – Advertising and Promotions

Ms CARNEY to CHIEF MINISTER

1. How much was spent on behalf of the Office of the Chief Minister on advertising/promotional activities/videos/DVDs/brochures and general printed matter in 2004-05?

2. Please provide a month-by-month breakdown of spending and projects/programs that this spending was for.

3. Detail the breakdown on local and interstate.

ANSWER

1. The only activity of this type funded by the Office of the Chief Minister was for advertising. Total expenditure in this regard was $24 618.99.

2. July 2004 $ 1401.65
August 2004 $ 383.40
September 2004 $ 2307.90
October 2004 $ 2179.68
November 2004 $ 2898.48
December 2004 $ 1604.53
January 2005 $ 2765.94
February 2005 $ 1438.86
March 2005 $ 81.00
Due to later invoicing by the vendor, approximately $2000 expenditure from March does not appear on the ledger until April


April 2005 $ 7672.36
Includes approximately $2000 expenditure from March as well as a $2900 annual listing in a trade publication.
May 2005 $ 1885.19
June 2005 Nil
Total: $24 618.99

3. All was local advertising with the exception of $2900 for a single listing in a trade publication printed by Dowd Publications, Queensland.

55. Office of Chief Minister – Darwin City Waterfront Promotions

Ms CARNEY to CHIEF MINISTER

1. How much has been spent directly from the Office of the Chief Minister specifically in 2004-05 on promoting the wharf precinct development by way of brochures, electronic media, newspaper advertisement and direct mail?

2. Please advise the detail of all other expenditure in 2004-05 from the Office of the Chief Minister on promoting the wharf precinct development?

ANSWER

Nil.

57. Office of Chief Minister – Public Focus Groups

Ms CARNEY to CHIEF MINISTER

1. How many public focus groups were conducted by the Office of the Chief Minister in 2004-05?

2. When were they held and what was the nature of each focus group?

3. What was the cost to conduct these focus groups?

4. If focus group participants were paid to attend, how much were they paid?

5. Where can Assembly members get the details and findings of these publicly-funded focus groups?

ANSWER

No focus groups were conducted by the Office of the Chief Minister in 2004-05.

61. Office of Chief Minister – Investment Advertising and Research

Ms CARNEY to CHIEF MINISTER

1. How much was spent by the Office of the Chief Minister on investment advertising interstate during 2004-05?

2. Detail a breakdown by state and the nature of the advertising.

3. Has any research been undertaken by the Office of the Chief Minister to evaluate the effectiveness of investment advertising interstate, to look to see what increase and awareness had been achieved?

4. If so, who carried out the research and what was the outcome of that research?

5. How much did the research cost?

ANSWER

1. No money was spent by the Office of the Chief Minister for this purpose.

2. Not applicable as no money was spent.

3. No expenditure.

4. Not applicable.

5. Not applicable.

62. Advertising on Government Web Site

Ms CARNEY to CHIEF MINISTER

1. Why is the government web site, funded and paid for by the Territory taxpayer, containing government press releases, maintained from the political Office of the Chief Minister?

2. Why is the web site paid for by taxpayers not maintained by the independent arm of the Department of Chief Minister rather than the very political arm of your office, particularly since your Good Governance document promises:

Labor will cut the waste, restricting advertising to the promotion of legitimate government needs, not de facto political advertising.

3. Do you condone the use of this taxpayer-funded web site by your office and ministers to promulgate political comment? In the interests of your Good Governance promises, will you return control of this web site to its proper keepers, the independent office of your department?

ANSWER

1. Across Australia, all state, federal and territory governments, with the exception of NSW, maintain a similar web site containing the media releases of all ministers.

2. In all states, the content of the web site is maintained by the ministerial office while the back end is maintained by the department.

3. This practice is consistent with the Northern Territory Government Guidelines for Information Programs Conducted by Ministers and the Leader of the Opposition, which was developed in consultation with the Leader of the Opposition’s office in 2004.

115. Business Round Table

Ms CARNEY to MINISTER for BUSINESS, ECONOMIC and RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT

What is the cost of holding each Business Round Table? How much of this advice has the government actually used directly in policy?

ANSWER

Ten BRT meetings were held in 2004, in each of the Territory’s main centres, with a total of 172 participants attending meetings during that year. To date in 2005, five BRT meetings have been held in Darwin, Alice Springs and Palmerston, with 75 participants in total. (The BRT meetings scheduled for July and August 2005 were cancelled due to the NT election.)

The BRT is intended as a low-cost community engagement initiative. Approximately $22 500 was spent on operational costs in 2004-05, comprising meeting expenses (venue hire, catering, meeting papers, etcetera), travel to regions, provision of web services, and an upgrade to the web site and associated database. Approximately $16 000 is budgeted for BRT operational expenses in 2005-06.

A diverse range of issues are discussed at Round Table meetings (more than 200 topics in 2003-04), and referred to agencies for appropriate action. Reports on all actions and outcomes are subsequently posted on the BRT web site www.businessroundtable.nt.gov.au for public information.

The consultation afforded by Business Round Tables has contributed to positive outcomes that have directly assisted businesses in the Northern Territory, and many issues raised at BRT meetings have had a direct and significant influence on government policy decisions. Recent examples from 2003-04 include:

Payroll Tax – throughout 2003-04, BRT participants had consistently reported that payroll tax was a disincentive to small business growth. Government has addressed these concerns by delivering significant payroll tax cuts, increasing the tax-free threshold in 2004 and 2005, with a further increase to take effect in 2006.

Population Growth – concerns by BRT participants about steady and sustainable population growth are being addressed by relevant agencies, including DEET, DBERD (formerly DBIRD) and DCM, in initiatives such as the Business and Skilled Migration Strategy and the recent Skills Attraction campaign. Feedback from BRT participants on the effectiveness of these strategies is conveyed to the agencies and contributes to program evaluation and future enhancements.

Employment and Workforce Issues – BRT participants have consistently reported difficulties with finding and keeping staff, and this information is conveyed to relevant agencies including DEET. The NT Jobs Plan and Jobs Plan 2 contain a comprehensive range of employment and training incentive programs which are focused on the needs of business and industry.

Procurement – reflecting the importance of government procurement to local business and industry, and concerns raised by business operators at BRT meetings and other forums, government introduced a package of procurement reforms including the new 30-day payment policy, improved training for agency procurement officers, and a reduced insurance requirement for certain contracts. Government has also created a new Government Procurement Liaison Officer position to monitor procurement processes and to provide a separate contact for industry in relation to procurement matters.

Public Liability Insurance – the government has developed a package of law reforms to create a more stable insurance environment. The reforms have been implemented as part of a nationally agreed framework coordinated through the Insurance Ministers Council. The measures are aimed at improving the availability of insurance cover, containing growth in premium costs, creating greater certainty for insurers, and changing social and legal attitudes towards the assumption of liability for risk.

The Chief Minister released a two-year overview report in December 2004, which examines these and other BRT activities and outcomes from 2003 to 2004. This report is provided to all BRT participants, and is publicly available on the BRT website.

120. Office of the Commissioner for Public Employment - Budget

Ms CARNEY to MINISTER for PUBLIC EMPLOYMENT

1. Why has the Office of the Commissioner for Public Employment budget blown out by over $1.3m over 2004-05?

2. Please provide where these blow-outs occurred.

3. Why are you planning to slash the budget by almost $1m this financial year – what have they done wrong?

4. What services and advice will be cut because of the budget slash?

ANSWER

The Office of the Commissioner for Public Employment does not have a budget blow-out. The $1.296m variation is attributed to one-off adjustments including the establishment costs for NT Build, NTGPASS Test Case, and revenue collected in advance for programs such as the Public Sector Management and Executive Management and Leadership Development Programs. In addition, and like other agencies, OCPE received a number of budget variations throughout the year.

1. 2004-05 Budget

Opening Closing Variation
$’000 $’000 $’000

OCPE 8028 9324 1296

2. The variation of the $1.296m is attributed to the following one-off’s:
$
Establishment costs for the NT Build 646 000
NTGPASS Test Case 25 000
Use of Balances for unearned revenue 256 000
Executive Development Program 70 000
Public Sector Management Program 170 000
Leadership Development Program 16 000
DCIS Notional Charges 187 000
EBA 5% increase 72 000
Other (including parameters and
other Goods And Services Revenue) 110 000

Total 1 296 000

3. The question does not make sense and appears to be based on a misunderstanding of the budget papers.

4. No services will be cut in 2005-06. The question appears to have been prompted by a misunderstanding of the budget papers.

121. Territory Public Servant Numbers

Ms CARNEY to MINISTER for PUBLIC EMPLOYMENT

What is the total number of public servants employed as at 30 June 2005, and what was the figure as at 30 June 2004?

ANSWER

As at 30 June 2004 there were 15 172 full-time equivalent NT public sector employees.

As at 30 June 2005 there were 15 849 full-time equivalent NT public sector employees.

122. Office of the Commissioner for Public Employment – Human Resources

Ms CARNEY to MINISTER for PUBLIC EMPLOYMENT

1. Why have you decided to outsource the provision of human resource advice in this department?

2. How many of those selected as part of the contract were from interstate?

3. Was it not a 2001 Labor Party election policy not to engage in outsourcing?

4. Why cannot you then attract human resource staff of sufficient calibre to work in the Northern Territory Public Sector – I would have thought that this was a high priority?

ANSWER

1. Human resource advice has not been outsourced by OCPE. A two-year panel contract for the provision of Human Resource Services was established in December 2004 in order to enhance existing services within Northern Territory government agencies. OCPE continues to be the central agency responsible for sector wide HR/IR strategic advice.

The establishment of the panel contract was in response to requests from agencies for a more simplified process. It replaces the ad hoc, agency by agency that was in use.

The panel contract covers the following areas:

1. Mediation/conciliation services;
2. internal investigation;
3. executive employment, recruitment selection and outplacement services;
4. industrial relations;
5. HRM/ER services;
6. performance review/evaluation; and
7. equity and diversity.

2. Eleven of the 26 consultants that have been selected for the panel contract are interstate based. Each panel is comprised of both NT based and interstate consultants to ensure NTG agencies have access to local providers wherever possible.

3. The establishment of the HR panel contract does not constitute outsourcing.

4. The NTPS has high quality human resources staff. The establishment of this panel contract supplements their roles.

123. HRM Grievances in Public Service

Ms CARNEY to MINISTER for PUBLIC EMPLOYMENT

1. Why were there 58 more grievances, appeals and complaints finalised than expected from last year’s budget?

2. Why are there more of these incidences occurring?

ANSWER

The estimate of 177 provided in the budget papers for 2005-06 reflected actual figures as at 31 March 2005

The increase in activity from the budget paper estimates for 2004-05 and actual grievance/appeals/complaints was influenced by an increase in the number of promotions and three bulk selection exercises within Department of Justice and one within Department of Corporate and Information Services drawing multiple promotions appeals and ‘protective’ appeals.

Due to a reallocation of OCPE resources there was an increase in finalised grievances; resulting from an overall increase in grievances generally and finalisation of some outstanding longer term grievances.

174. Police, Fire and Emergency Services - E-mail of Political Material

Ms CARNEY to MINISTER for POLICE, FIRE and EMERGENCY SERVICES

Is it a regular occurrence for the e-mail system to be used sending material to Police, Fire and Emergency Services personnel on behalf of government, whether police want political material from the government or not?

ANSWER

No.

176. Fire Truck for Training Purposes

Ms CARNEY to MINISTER for POLICE, FIRE and EMERGENCY SERVICES

One of the points made in the Metis Review was that there is not a fire truck available for training purposes. Has this problem been rectified?

ANSWER

Yes.

177. Training College

Ms CARNEY to MINISTER for POLICE, FIRE and EMERGENCY SERVICES

Due to the number of recruits in the tri-service training college and the amount of in-service training currently being undertaken, there is pressure on the college to meet those demands and resources are stretched.

What has been done to reduce those pressures in 2004-05 and what is planned for 2005-06?

ANSWER

The college will continue to provide a service to meet the training needs of the agency on an as-needs basis.

178. Police, Fire and Emergency Services – Management of Drunk Offenders

Ms CARNEY to MINISTER for POLICE, FIRE and EMERGENCY SERVICES

1. How many extra police will be devoted specifically to this task of collecting drunks?

2. What is the forecast increase in operational costs for this drunks’ collection service?
3. How many extra vehicles will be put on the road to deal with the collection of drunks?

4. When the drunks are collected by police, what will happen to them? (ie where will they be taken?)

5. If a drunk is picked up, say, at Casuarina and is being conveyed to the police cells, what is the time that this vehicle and its officers will effectively be off the road?

6. How does the Police Commissioner prioritise issues of policing, ie, where does the shuttling of drunks to sobering-up shelters and police cells sit on the priority scale in comparison to controlling gangs and street violence or simply protecting people’s property and homes?

ANSWER

1. Eight additional Aboriginal Community Police Officers will be employed to assist existing resources in targeting antisocial activity, hot spots and public intoxication.

2. $770 000 in new funding.

3. Two.

4. Persons apprehended for protective custody are currently taken to the sobering-up shelter if one is operating in that community. Alternatives are to convey the intoxicated person to the police lock-up or where appropriate, to another place where there is a person who is sober and willing to take care of the intoxicated person until such a time as the person is not in need of care.

5. If a person is apprehended for protective custody at the Casuarina Shopping Centre, he or she would most likely be conveyed to the sobering-up shelter (SUS) in Coconut Grove - a turnaround time of about 30 minutes. If the intoxicated person is, for a number of reasons, conveyed to the watch house in the city, the turnaround time would increase to about 50 minutes.

6. Social disorder and public drunkenness are areas of concern to the community and are often precursors to more serious problems. Utilising intelligence-led policing in conjunction with a partnership approach with key community stakeholders, different approaches and priorities are established at unit, station, division and command level.

181. Counter-Terrorism Security

Ms CARNEY to MINISTER for POLICE, FIRE and EMERGENCY SERVICES

What was the work of the Northern Territory’s Counter-Terrorism Security Coordination Unit in 2004-05 and what is its budget?

ANSWER

The Territory’s Counter-Terrorism Security Coordination Unit (CTSCU) undertook a wide range of initiatives to enhance security from a counter-terrorism perspective during the 2004-05 period. These initiatives included capability development, training, exercising, planning and equipment procurement across the 12 recognised specialist CT areas of Command, Tactical, Bomb Response, Bomb Scene Examination, Media, Negotiation, Intelligence, Police Technical Unit, Exercise Management, Dignitary Protection, Crisis Centre Development, and Integration of Crisis and Consequence Management.

The CTSCU facilitated the NT’s participation in two of the largest counter-terrorism exercises ever conducted in Australia, MJEX05 and ICMEX05. These exercises involved whole-of-government response to simulated terrorist acts in and around Darwin, and were funded by the Australian government.

The CTSCU was also responsible for developing formal counter-terrorism plans for the Northern Territory including the NT Counter-Terrorism Plan, and the NT Chemical Biological and Radiological (CBR) Response Plan.

The CTSCU is heavily involved in all facets of counter-terrorism security arrangements involving the maritime, aviation and surface transport sectors, and all critical infrastructure throughout the NT.

The CTSCU is the focal point for counter-terrorism in the NT, with significant involvement at both Territory and national levels in ensuring consistent security arrangements are developed and implemented within this jurisdiction.

During the 2004-05 financial year, the CTSCU operational budget was $181 000 and the personnel budget $439 000. A similar level of funding will be provided in the 2005-06 financial year.

In addition, the CTSCU managed a Commonwealth Regional Aviation Security Program budget allocation of $80 000 in 2004-05. This is part of a four-year ($600 000) allocation from the Commonwealth Department of Transport and Regional Services, to enhance aviation security at the 17 identified regional airports across the NT.

Special funding from the Northern Territory government of $1m over three years commencing in 2004-05 was provided for equipment and training, to enhance the counter-terrorism response capability of the Northern Territory Police, Fire and Emergency Services. $400 000 of this allocation dedicated to counter-terrorism initiatives during the 2004-05 period to provide:

specialist CT equipment;
specialist CT training and capability development courses; and
Northern Territory Police participation in critical national counter-terrorism forums and workshops to ensure the NT maintains currency in national and international developments and trends concerning terrorism.

$303 000 is programmed for this purpose in the 2005-06 period, and a further $297 000 is programmed for the 2006-07 financial year.

186. Road Safety Program

Ms CARNEY to MINISTER for POLICE, FIRE and EMERGENCY SERVICES

The original budget of 2002-03 for road safety services was $11m. In 2005-06 it will be $9.288m. Given that government is claiming there are more cars on our roads because of new registrations and increasing population, why is less being spent on road safety in the Northern Territory?

ANSWER

The Northern Territory Police Force has adopted an intelligence led approach to road safety enforcement and education. The current strategies use an intelligence-led approach to identify and target ‘hot spots’ of offending activities and recidivist offenders. This approach allows a far more efficient and effective deployment of resources with a focus on prevention and reducing serious and fatal motor vehicle crashes. Education strategies include lectures delivered to high school students, Defence personnel and other user groups to increase road safety awareness. The introduction of the Beat the Heat Program is a further example of a road safety partnership focusing on a key at risk group; namely young and inexperienced drivers. Enforcement strategies have been enhanced through the purchase and introduction of 20 new upgraded laser and radar speed detection devices, 150 new alcohol screening devices and 47 new breath analysis instruments. These resources have increased proactive enforcement capacities and have resulted in a greater cross-section of operational police being better equipped to carry out enforcement activities.

187. Speed Camera Checks

Ms CARNEY to MINISTER for POLICE, FIRE and EMERGENCY SERVICES

In terms of performance measures, are there any plans to increase the number of speed camera checks in 2005-06?

ANSWER

A current NT Police Road Safety enforcement performance measure relates to policing activity, and this includes the number of vehicles checked by both Static and Mobile Speed Detection Devices.

The issue of speed camera checks is dependent upon the traffic flow of the testing location. These locations are determined by traffic ’hot spots’ associated with road crash statistics, and therefore are less relevant in terms of volume, and more so with respect to percentage of offending drivers per total numbers checked.

194. Emergency Response Capabilities –Yulara

Ms CARNEY to MINISTER for POLICE, FIRE and EMERGENCY SERVICES

Please detail the number of incidents in which Yulara and Kings Canyon emergency services capabilities were put to the test.

ANSWER

Full details concerning emergency services deployments, both at Yulara and Kings Canyon (Watarrka) are contained in the Police, Fire and Emergency Services Annual Report 2004-05.

195. Fire and Road Trauma Emergency Services

Ms CARNEY to MINISTER for POLICE, FIRE and EMERGENCY SERVICES

What strategies were implemented across the Northern Territory in 2004-05 so that the capacity of agencies to respond to fire threats and road trauma were increased?

ANSWER

From a NTES perspective, an innovative initiative in relation to the reduction of road trauma was the establishment, in May 2005, of the Northern Territory Emergency Response Post at Kings Canyon and the entrance to Watarrka National Park.

The post is manned by a permanent Emergency Service Officer who provides first response to the many road traffic accidents on the Luritja and Mereenie Loop roads in conjunction with the newly established Watarrka Emergency Service Volunteer Unit. The post is fully equipped for road accident rescue duties and response to vertical rescue events occurring at Kings Canyon. Since establishment, the post has dealt with a variety of accidents and incidents involving injured and lost persons and, additionally, acts as a liaison point for counter disaster response and wildfire incidents in the Watarrka area.

Strategies implemented in 2004-05 were:

Safer Communities:
Development of a two-year Community Safety Strategy.
Development of a four-year Fire Reduction Strategy.
A Juvenile Fire Awareness Program was implemented to counsel children who exhibit fire lighting behaviour.
A review into the response capabilities at Yulara and Kings Canyon was carried out. As a result of this review, a permanent NTES officer was established at Kings Canyon along with a road accident rescue capability.
A new fire station was opened at Humpty Doo. This station is crewed by permanent fire officers.
The Hazard Abatement Officer’s duties were reviewed. This officer now provides hazard abatement services to all NTFRS emergency response areas.
Establishment of a Volunteer Manager position to improve services and provide greater support to volunteer brigades in remote and isolated communities.
An increase in permanent staff at Yulara, Katherine and Tennant Creek fire stations.
Increase in fire response equipment at Yulara with the commissioning of an additional grass fire unit to the station.
New fire tanker commissioned at Alice Springs Fire Station.

Road Accident Rescue:
New rescue trucks commissioned at Yulara and Katherine.
Establishment of a road accident rescue capability at Kings Canyon.
Upgrading of road accident rescue equipment for NTES Units and Fire and Emergency Response Groups.
Heavy rescue equipment was commissioned at Katherine and Alice Springs.

226. Water and Weed Management- Funding

Ms CARNEY to MINISTER for NATURAL RESOURCES, ENVIRONMENT and HERITAGE

In continuing with the bad news for Primary Industry in this budget, Water and Weed Management budget has been reduced by $410 000.

Given that the Northern Territory has serious problems with gamba and Ngurra burr, amongst other weeds, and your government has stated many times that you are concerned about water management, why have you cut the budget in this area by $410 000?

ANSWER

There has been no decrease in the 2005-06 budget for water management.

There has been a $410 000 reduction in Natural Heritage Trust Commonwealth funding for natural resource management. The Northern Territory government is not responsible for Commonwealth funding reductions.

240. Cane Toads

Ms CARNEY to MINISTER for NATURAL RESOURCES, ENVIRONMENT and HERITAGE

Considerable time by your government has been put into addressing the invasion of cane toads in the Northern Territory. Interestingly enough, the seriousness of the cane toads was not addressed until they were literally invading the northern suburbs. They had been in the Northern Territory for a considerable time before that.

Can you please tell me what funding is allocated in this budget for cane toad eradication?

ANSWER

The member’s use of the word ‘eradication’ is inappropriate. Nowhere in the world has a single invasive/feral species ever been ‘eradicated’ from a continental environment once established (Bomford, M. (2003) Risk Assessment for the Import and Keeping of Exotic Vertebrates in Australia. Bureau of Rural Sciences, Canberra.). What is accomplished is effective management of the invasive/feral species.

Funding allocated in the 2005-06 budget for cane toad management totals $480 000:
$100 000 for the third year of the Island Ark project (this includes the quoll relocation program and the island bio-security program);

$100 000 for long-term control measures (this is for the development of modelling of control mechanisms and determination of optimal control strategy);

$270 000 for community based cane toad management project in the greater Darwin urban and rural area (FrogWatch NT project); and

$10 000 for continuation of the National Cane Toad Task Force.

Additionally, $390 000 will be allocated from the 2004-05 and $30 000 from the 2005-06 NRM Strategic Reserve, representing matching federal funding for the $420 000 of NT funding for the community based cane toad management project.
$390 000 for 2005-06 will be broken up into:

$200 000 for moderating environmental impacts of cane toad invasion – conservation of northern quoll;

$120 000 for enhanced island bio-security – protection of barge facilities in Darwin and Gove; and

$70 000 for community awareness in the Victoria River District – cooperative management with Western Australia to increase community awareness of the cane toad issue in the Victoria River District to assist in prevention of the spread of the cane toad into WA.

An election commitment was also made of $100 000 for a cane toad trap subsidy of $30 per trap, for approved design traps.

ANSWERS TO WRITTEN QUESTIONS
ATTACHMENT A – Answer to Question 2
DIVISIONAL ENROLMENT - 30/6/04 TO 30/6/05

    DIVISION
    30/6/04
    IMMEDIATELY BEFORE
    REDISTRIBUTION
    23/9/04
    IMMEDIATELY FOLLOWING
    REDISTRIBUTION
30/6/05
    ARAFURA
    4471
      4599
      4599
    4607
    ARALUEN
    4404
      4498
      4498
    4505
    ARNHEM
    4563
      4709
      4709
    4754
    BARKLY
    3789
      3933
      4190
    4214
    BLAIN
    4361
      4490
      4490
    4503
    BRAITLING
    4537
      4557
      4383
    4353
    BRENNAN
    5183
      5366
      4513
    4539
    CASUARINA
    4100
      4206
      4206
    4223
    DALY
    4008
      4113
      4633
    4705
    DRYSDALE
    4647
      4858
      4448
    4554
    FANNIE BAY
    4165
      4249
      4646
    4691
    GOYDER
    4565
      4741
      4472
    4494
    GREATOREX
    4657
      4726
      4567
    4536
    JOHNSTON
    4229
      4293
      4293
    4298
    KARAMA
    4327
      4304
      4304
    4345
    KATHERINE
    3870
      3921
      4705
    4675
    MACDONNELL
    4321
      4444
      4444
    4479
    MILLNER
    4282
      4433
      4433
    4434
    NELSON
    4128
      4273
      4501
    4650
    NHULUNBUY
    4492
      4480
      4480
    4651
    NIGHTCLIFF
    4347
      4487
      4487
    4418
    PORT DARWIN
    4503
      4788
      4391
    4530
    SANDERSON
    4309
      4381
      4381
    4382
    STUART
    3963
      4028
      4104
    4268
    WANGURI
    4258
    4253
      4253
    4287
    TOTAL
108,479
      111,130
      111,130
    112,095

ANSWERS TO WRITTEN QUESTIONS
ATTACHMENT B – Answer to Question 2

ROLL ADDITION TRANSACTIONS
CLOSE OF ROLLS PERIOD (31/5/05 TO 2/6/05 INCLUSIVE)

    DIVISION
    NEW
ENROLMENT
RE-
ENROLMENT
TRANSFERS
IN FROM
INTRASTATE
TRANSFERS
IN FROM
INTERSTATE
    CHANGES WITHIN SAME DIVISION
TOTALS
    ARAFURA
35
4
27
17
73
156
    ARALUEN
25
30
63
55
25
198
    ARNHEM
2
6
9
1
4
22
    BARKLY
22
8
42
13
19
104
    BLAIN
15
20
53
21
10
119
    BRAITLING
16
15
32
23
11
97
    BRENNAN
22
16
56
68
20
182
    CASUARINA
19
14
56
20
4
113
    DALY
21
6
23
14
11
75
    DRYSDALE
15
25
81
92
19
232
    FANNIE BAY
15
33
45
49
18
160
    GOYDER
11
19
34
13
9
86
    GREATOREX
21
16
46
27
19
129
    JOHNSTON
23
20
39
22
4
108
    KARAMA
17
22
23
14
0
76
    KATHERINE
5
9
11
26
18
69
    MACDONNELL
31
13
35
27
61
167
    MILLNER
24
23
58
51
12
168
    NELSON
21
22
43
16
8
110
    NHULUNBUY
7
2
15
11
3
38
    NIGHTCLIFF
23
32
61
53
16
185
    PORT DARWIN
22
28
77
78
26
231
    SANDERSON
16
13
54
37
9
129
    STUART
46
7
23
6
78
160
    WANGURI
17
14
44
36
11
122
    TOTALS
491
417
1050
790
488
3236

CATEGORIES OF ROLL ADDITIONS

          New Enrolments
          Electors enrolling for the division who have not been enrolled previously on any state/territory roll.

          Note: Includes provisional electors who turn 18 years of age
          Re-Enrolments
          Electors enrolling for the division who are not currently on any state/territory roll but who have been enrolled on a state/territory roll in the past
          Transfers In from Interstate
          Electors enrolling for the division who are currently enrolled at an interstate address
          Transfers In from Intrastate
          Electors enrolling for the division who are currently enrolled at an address in another division of the NT
          Changes within same Division
          Electors enrolling for the division who are currently enrolled for the same address or another address within the same division.

          Note: Includes enrolment transactions that only generate changes to names, personal details and mailing addresses.


ATTACHMENT C – Answer to Question 3


          Question 1
    Question 2
          Basis of Payment
Method of Payment Estimated Amount (nominal dollars) Approximate TimingRevenue Source
    Stage 1
          12% of gross proceeds
Bank cheque$8.4m2008-09Residential sales
          10% of gross proceeds
Bank cheque$2.0m2008-09Non-residential sales
    Stage 2
          18% of gross proceeds
Bank cheque$170.0m2009 to 2018Residential sales
          10% of gross proceeds
Bank cheque$10.7m2009 to 2018Non- residential sales
          Statutory rates / levies / concession charges
Annual charges$1.0m to $2.0mPer annum on completionProperty owners / concession holders
          DCEC revenue nett against expenses
Reduction in Territory op contribution($2.5m) forecast in first stabilised year of operationPer annum from openingDCEC concession period operations
Last updated: 04 Aug 2016